Zeitgeist:  Then and Now

Zeitgeist:  Then and Now

Two magazine covers; one from 1982, the other from 2014.

Both are pretty typical of their respective eras, and illustrate how differently fly fishing is portrayed today.

 

 

Some of the tag lines used in the advertisements from each year shed further light on the generational differences in zeitgeist.

1982 Tag Lines:

Whatever the conditions, we've got the right line for you.  (Scientific Anglers)

Your fishing rod.  It's only as good as the blank.  (Fenwick Rod Co.)

Longer casts, less effort.  (Cortland Line Co.)

By which others are judged.  (H.L. Leonard Rod Co.)

Scott—There's a difference.  (Scott Rod Co.)

2014 Tag Lines:

Helios 2.  Feed Your Addiction.  (Orvis)

Crafted for Chaos  (Abel)

Feel the Pull  (Cortland)

Blow that weak-casting, no-feeling, strike-missing, energy-sucking, bungie-stretching fly line out of the water  (Rio Products)

Success is Never Overrated in Fly Fishing (R.L. Winston)

Nature's a Mother (Yeti)

One of the beauties of fly fishing, at least to me, is that everyone participating in it is free to choose for themselves how to engage with the sport.  From how to think about it, how to approach it, how to participate in it—each of us decides what feels right.   Are you a "Longer casts, less effort" or a "Feel the Pull" angler?  Either way, I think there's room in the sport for both.

—John

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Regarding the Tight Loop

Here's a little known fact about tight loops, often considered the Holy Grail of flycasting.  A tight loop is the de facto fly line response to a mechanically sound casting stroke.  That's right.  If you've got a sound casting stroke (and use it in the correct length), you'll automatically produce a tight loop.  On every cast.  The physics of flycasting simply don't allow it to be otherwise.  In fact, to not throw a tight loop requires a conscious adjustment to the casting stroke.

So if you're struggling to throw tight loops, or to throw them consistently, it's likely that your casting stroke contains flaws.  Since nothing will improve your fishing more than improving your casting, fixing a faulty stroke is an excellent idea.  A good instructor can easily get you started on the right path.  Practice will be essential too, of course, but acquiring a good casting stroke isn't as hard as most people think.

—John

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In Quiet, He Fishes

In Quiet, He Fishes

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Moving Your Feet

While fishing a fine Baetis hatch on the Henry’s Fork recently, I watched as the I friend I was with struggled to fool the rising fish that surrounded him.  This surprised me.  My friend is a competent angler who knows fishing, the river and its flies—no stranger to success, he.  I watched him try a number of different flies, without luck.  He tried different fish too, directing his casts towards any riser that dared show within his considerable casting range.  What he did not try, conspicuously, was changing his casting position.  Feet firmly planted, he fished as the proverbial immovable object.  On a river like the Henry’s Fork, beset as it is with tortuous surface currents that love to drag a fly around, this can be the kiss of death.  In the end, relying on nothing but brute determination and casting skill, my friend netted a few trout.  But his success was nothing like normal.

It reminded me of something Vince Marinaro wrote about presentation.  This, from his 1976 book, In the Ring of the Rise: “…the modern, narrow, oversimplistic approach of relying on [fly] pattern alone…instead of observing the trout and exploring all the available options in the all-important matter of presentation.”  This was precisely my friend’s downfall.  He had engaged in too much fly changing and had paid too little attention to presentation. When we’d finished for the day, he admitted as much.  He said that he’d failed to “fish with my feet.”  It was simply easier to stand in one spot and try different flies rather than wade carefully and fish from the spots which offered the best possible drift.  I certainly understood; I’ve been guilty of this myself.  But fishing with your feet is such an important part of good presentation that we would all do well not to overlook it.

—John

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A Question of Beauty

For a couple seasons now, my co-worker Bucky McCormick has been going retrograde with his flies.  He's been tying and fishing classic patterns.  By classic I mean older flies with some degree of historical significance, like the Quill Gordon, Brown Bivisible and Black-Nose Dace.  Patterns that practically nobody fishes anymore, especially here in the West.  (Last time I used one myself was in the early 1980's, gulper fishing on Hebgen Lake.  My fly of choice then was a #16 Adams—a classic, to be sure, and still a good imitation of a Callibaetis mayfly.)  Bucky's decision to shun modern flies in favor of the classics is far from a judgment on their effectiveness.  Rather, it's a statement about their beauty.  Or lack thereof.  With an emphasis on unconventional form and a reliance on synthetic materials, Bucky finds modern flies lacking in both grace and elegance.  To him, they're simply...ugly.  And having fished for decades, he's arrived at a point in his angling career where ugly no longer works for him.  He sees beauty in the classics, and beauty matters now.

I found that idea quite interesting.  It prompted me to ask him if he thought the beauty in a classic fly was intrinsic to the fly itself, or whether it lay strictly in the eye of the beholder.  He said that it was inherent in the flies themselves:  beauty as a function of both design and the employment of all-natural materials.  I wasn't as certain about that, and decided to argue the other side.  A Quill Gordon, I proffered, acquired its shape because it was nothing more than a knock-off of 18th-century English mayfly design.  Beauty never entered the equation as a design concern—on either side of the Atlantic.  It was function and form that drove design.  As for the materials, well, the tiers of old had no choice.  Organic was their sole option.  So I argued that the conception of beauty in a Catskill dry fly—or any other classic fly for that matter—simply depended on when a person arrived to the sport.  Anglers old enough to have been exposed to the classics at a young age, or when they were still widely fished, tend to consider them in aesthetic terms.  They'll use words like "pretty" or "beautiful" to describe a fly.  Younger fishermen think differently.  They aren't nearly as apt to describe or draw a distinction between flies—classic or modern—based on aesthetic concerns.

Bucky wasn't buying it.  Truth be told, I'm not sure I was, either.  Because deep down inside, I see and feel the same things in the classics that he does.  The stylish lines of a Catskill dry fly, the flair of a well-tied Henryville Special, the elegance in a sleek, antediluvian bucktail streamer—it's all beautiful to me, too.  But unlike Bucky, I'm not sure I can trust my judgment.  I've been fishing for a long time too, and I'm suspicious that my views have been unduly colored by a romanticism rooted in those many years of experience.  I question whether I'm truly capable of escaping that experience and making an unbiased judgment.  And so while Bucky harbors no doubts, I've been left to wonder, still, where does the beauty in a fly lie?

—John

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